Hypatia review of Phenomenology of Illness

Over at Hypatia Reviews Online, Christine Wieseler (U-Texas McGovern Center for Humanities & Ethics) has given a concise and useful review of a new book in philosophy of medicine. That book, Phenomenology of Illness by Havi Carel (University of Bristol, UK), … Continue reading

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The Revenge Effects of Electronic Medical Records
Alison Reiheld

In 1996, historian of science Edward Tenner published his influential book Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences. It is an extended consideration of how technology comes to demand much of us even as it frees us from … Continue reading

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Pregnancy and Childbirth for Mothers with Disabilities
Editor

Every once in awhile a venue surprises you: Teen Vogue has been doing good critical reporting on social justice issues and American politics, and Cosmopolitan–long the home of beauty tips and how to please your man–has just published an article … Continue reading

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TENTH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE OF IJFAB is an embarassment of riches
Editor

Our parent journal, International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, is celebrating its 10th anniversary.  Lo those many years ago in Spring of 2008, our first issue, Doing Feminist Bioethics, was published. In the second issue, Lyerly, Little, and Faden’s article on … Continue reading

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Power, othering, and slurs in the clinic: undermining the capacity for care
Alison Reiheld

Over at the Feminist Midwife, we find a valuable post on WHY something that may seem prima facie wrong is, in fact, wrong.  In an entry called “Patients Are Not Bitches, and Thoughts Medical Othering,” Feminist Midwife considers a case … Continue reading

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Not Business As Usual: President Trump reinstates Mexico City Policy with a substantive addition
Editor

On January 23, 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump reinstated Reagan’s so-called Mexico City Policy, also known as the “global gag rule.”  In the process, he also added text that makes a substantive change going farther than any U.S. national-level anti-abortion … Continue reading

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Bioethics Meets Families in The Netherlands this Summer
Jamie Nelson

EDITOR’S NOTE: IJFAB Blog is pleased to have Jamie L. Nelson, of IJFAB’s editorial team and Michigan State University, join us as a regular contributor. Her work has been linked from the blog previously in this entry on Bathrooms, Binaries, … Continue reading

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“My death seems to me less bad”: Derek Parfit died January 1, 2017
Editor

Philosopher Derek Parfit was known for many things, though chiefly for his work on identity which is of great interest to medical ethicists. How is that one can say one is the same thing over time?  And how does this … Continue reading

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Midwifery as feminist endeavor: a particular blog entry and a blog recommendation
Editor

Over at Feminist Midwife, the eponymous author writes about the nature of midwifery and why they see it as inherently feminist. In 2014, they also addressed the well-known (by bioethicists) issues with whether informed consent really takes place or whether, … Continue reading

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Of births and beds: thinking spatially about obstetric violence
Rachel Tillman

After giving birth last year in Colombia, I spoke with a (male) Colombian doctor friend of mine about my experience. We were talking about what in Spanish are called “partos verticales”, or “vertical” births  – births in which the mother … Continue reading

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American Academy of Pediatrics makes major shift in recommendations on overweight and obesity
Editor

The American Academy of Pediatrics announced last week that it was radically changing its guidelines for treatment of overweight and obesity in children and teens.  Specifically, it recommends DEemphasizing dieting and weight loss while avoiding any kind of public shaming … Continue reading

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End-of-life care, and counseling, varies with disease type
Editor

US News and World Report recently published an article summarizing the results of a study of Veterans Affairs hospitals. The study found that patients with cancer or dementia received better end-of-life counseling, more palliative care, and better end-of-life planning on the … Continue reading

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