Not a desire which anyone may gratify: what impact might artificial wombs have on abortion?
Alison Reiheld

Amidst the flurry of news in the last week over artificial wombs–a primitive artificial placental sack, or “biobag”, sustained sheep fetuses for four weeks–most of the coverage focused on the value in caring for premature infants. I was reminded of Judith … Continue reading

Share Button

The ABCs of the AHCA: A is for abortion, B is for backward, C is for costly
Rory Kraft

EDITOR’S NOTE: This piece’s posting was delayed by technical errors. However, the analysis of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) is still pressing and relevant. While the bill was pulled from a planned House vote in the US Congress on … Continue reading

Share Button

Ebola Stigma and Lack of Access to Care in Liberia Cost the Life of an Ebola Fighter After Complications of Childbirth
Editor

Salome Karwah was recognized by Time magazine as an Ebola fighter during the 2015 Ebola outbreak. She died February 21 from complications of childbirth by C-section. Days after the procedure, she collapsed from a seizure and began foaming at the … Continue reading

Share Button

Not Business As Usual: President Trump reinstates Mexico City Policy with a substantive addition
Editor

On January 23, 2017, U.S. President Donald Trump reinstated Reagan’s so-called Mexico City Policy, also known as the “global gag rule.”  In the process, he also added text that makes a substantive change going farther than any U.S. national-level anti-abortion … Continue reading

Share Button

Bioethics Meets Families in The Netherlands this Summer
Jamie Nelson

EDITOR’S NOTE: IJFAB Blog is pleased to have Jamie L. Nelson, of IJFAB’s editorial team and Michigan State University, join us as a regular contributor. Her work has been linked from the blog previously in this entry on Bathrooms, Binaries, … Continue reading

Share Button

THE FOUR TASKS OF GRIEF: WHY THEY MATTER NO MATTER WHOM YOU VOTED FOR
Ann Mongoven

I am facilitating an integrated humanities class at Michigan State University called “the good death: ethical challenges of death and dying.” The class is indebted to grief educators who stress what William Worden termed The Four Tasks of Grief. These … Continue reading

Share Button

End-of-life care, and counseling, varies with disease type
Editor

US News and World Report recently published an article summarizing the results of a study of Veterans Affairs hospitals. The study found that patients with cancer or dementia received better end-of-life counseling, more palliative care, and better end-of-life planning on the … Continue reading

Share Button