Who Should Be Responsible for Environment, Health, and Politics: Detroit and 1,300 other “hotspots” have higher lead poisoning rates than Flint and someone needs to do something
Alison Reiheld

The long-time reader of IJFAB Blog, and alert bioethicist who follows the news, will remember the Flint water crisis.  As numerous investigative news articles–and even at least one news comedy show–have pointed out, Flint is by no means alone in the … Continue reading

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Disparities in Maternal Mortality: Some American women have a higher risk of the highest cost of being pregnant
Editor

Maternal mortality is a basic public health measure. It is also one of the many health outcomes on which the United States ranks much lower than other comparably developed nations. As per Ann Simmons’ superb article on the subject of … Continue reading

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What you don’t know CAN hurt you: Epistemic Injustice and Conceptually Impoverished Health Promotion
Alison Reiheld

I want to consider a particular kind of wrong within medicine and health promotion: epistemic injustice and its harms. My case study is obesity conceived of as a public health concern. However, the analytic framework I deploy may prove useful … Continue reading

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Gene editing technology: Where should we draw the line?
Editor

Editor’s Note: This guest post comes to us from bioethicist Françoise Baylis. Professor Baylis is the Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy at Dalhousie University, Editor of the Canadian bioethics blog Impact Ethics, the author of numerous superb articles using feminist … Continue reading

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Fall 2017 issue of IJFAB is out, with special section Remembering Anne Donchin
Editor

If you have already received your paper copy of the new Fall 2017 issue of International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (Vol 10 Iss 2), you will have noticed a new look. You may also have noticed that the journal’s international … Continue reading

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Health consequences of Flint water crisis grow
Editor

Recent reports indicate that the water crisis in Flint, MI, had unpredicted health consequences including increasing the rate of fetal deaths and miscarriages. The effect size is described by the authors of a new working paper as “horrifyingly large.”  You … Continue reading

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Should immigration enforcement take place in hospitals?
Editor

America’s National Public Radio (NPR) aired a piece yesterday about a family that was waiting for care for their sick infant, when immigration enforcement moved and took the parents into custody after following them around the hospital for a long … Continue reading

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The Balking Dead: the undying effort to repeal and replace the ACA’s attempt to provide greater access to health care in the U.S.
Rory Kraft

Editor’s Note: Scroll to the bottom of this blog entry by Rory Kraft for a list of his prior blog articles on attempts to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act, AKA Obamacare, as well as other IJFAB blog entries … Continue reading

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The mental health costs of losing DACA
Editor

The New York Times has an article in yesterday’s paper called “The Psychic Toll of Trump’s DACA Decision.” As you may know, DACA refers to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program in the United States. It is an initiative … Continue reading

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Bioethics, Family, and Summer School: Part 6 – The Final Day and the “good enough” family
Ben Kenofer

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of short blog posts about the bioethics summer school in Groningen, the Netherlands, which is focused on the role of family in the delivery and consumption of health care. Look for others … Continue reading

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Only 2 clinics remain in the US to perform late-pregnancy abortion
Editor

For some time now, there have only been 3 clinics in the United States that will perform late abortions (to read more about some late abortions, see this IJFAB blog entry on the topic). One of these, the Germantown Clinic … Continue reading

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Informed Decision-making on Contraception Might Need These Charts Comparing Different Methods
Editor

Over in the New York Times, Gregor Aisch and Bill Marsh have an explainer with superb infographics on the comparative effectiveness of various contraceptive methods with respect to unplanned pregnancy. The graphs compare actual with ideal use, and have a slider … Continue reading

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