“Rogue” doctor in India provides fertility to older patients
Editor

As profiled in a recent Independent article, Dr. Anurog Bishnoi provides in vitro fertilization services to women who are often deemed “too old” by medical standards. Reading this excerpt, and the article, you might keep in mind classic themes of bioethics and … Continue reading

Share Button

Hypatia review of Phenomenology of Illness

Over at Hypatia Reviews Online, Christine Wieseler (U-Texas McGovern Center for Humanities & Ethics) has given a concise and useful review of a new book in philosophy of medicine. That book, Phenomenology of Illness by Havi Carel (University of Bristol, UK), … Continue reading

Share Button

To reproduce or not to reproduce, and if so how much, that is the question
Alison Reiheld

Over at Foreign Policy recently, philosophers Travis Rieder and Rebecca Kukla engaged in a thoughtful, pleasant, and yet provocative dialogue about reproductive considerations in light of climate change (Rieder, Colin Hickey, and Jake Earl recently published an article about the … Continue reading

Share Button

“Intersex Patients ‘Routinely Lied To By Doctors'”, per recent BBC Radio 4 article
Editor

Surprising absolutely no one who follows the history of intersex treatment in the United States, BBC Radio 4 has a recent story about the history of intersex treatment in the UK with the provocative headline “Intersex Patients ‘Routinely Lied To … Continue reading

Share Button

Mandatory Sterilization for transgender people as a requirement of legal gender recognition struck down in Europe
Editor

Four years ago, nearly to the day, IJFAB Blog contributor Alison Reiheld wrote on the repeal of Swedish laws that had required transgender person to be sterile (or become sterile) AND to have surgical sex reassignment in order to change … Continue reading

Share Button

Body Ecology and Commodification in The Handmaid’s Tale
Rebecca Bratten Weiss

Editor’s Note: This is one of several blog entries on Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. For the first in the series, go here. The Handmaid’s Tale was one of many texts which, when I finally read it, turned out to be very different … Continue reading

Share Button

Pregnancy and Childbirth for Mothers with Disabilities
Editor

Every once in awhile a venue surprises you: Teen Vogue has been doing good critical reporting on social justice issues and American politics, and Cosmopolitan–long the home of beauty tips and how to please your man–has just published an article … Continue reading

Share Button

Labor Without Respite: Tennis, pregnancy, and other ‘unexpected feats’

GUEST CONTRIBUTORS Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra (Dr. sc. med., Research Associate, Liminal Spaces Project; Teaching Fellow, School of Law; Executive committee member, Mason Institute; University of Edinburgh Law School, UK) Verina Wild (Dr. med., Philosophy Department, Ludwig-Maximilians- University Munich, Germany)  Social media … Continue reading

Share Button

The Handmaid’s Tale: a roundup of media sources and related prior IJFAB Blog entries
Editor

Editor’s Note: See “Body Ecology and Commodification in The Handmaid’s Tale” by Rebecca Bratten Weiss, and more to come. Over the next few weeks, IJFAB Blog will have several original blog entries on The Handmaid’s Tale, both the book and … Continue reading

Share Button

Like and unlike: Late abortion in the case of wanted pregnancies, and miscarriage
Alison Reiheld

A recent article by Natalia Megas in The Guardian profiles three women who chose late abortions and who had very much wanted to be pregnant.  It is a moving exploration of the seriousness of abortion as a moral issue, and an important set … Continue reading

Share Button

TENTH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE OF IJFAB is an embarassment of riches
Editor

Our parent journal, International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, is celebrating its 10th anniversary.  Lo those many years ago in Spring of 2008, our first issue, Doing Feminist Bioethics, was published. In the second issue, Lyerly, Little, and Faden’s article on … Continue reading

Share Button

Each English language user is about to meet their language’s new gender neutral singular pronoun, with the release of the new Associated Press Stylebook
Editor

For some time now, there has been a movement to address the English language’s need for a gender neutral singular pronoun. This need originates in the growing realization that using “he” to refer to a person whose gender you do … Continue reading

Share Button