Ebola Stigma and Lack of Access to Care in Liberia Cost the Life of an Ebola Fighter After Complications of Childbirth
Editor

Salome Karwah was recognized by Time magazine as an Ebola fighter during the 2015 Ebola outbreak. She died February 21 from complications of childbirth by C-section. Days after the procedure, she collapsed from a seizure and began foaming at the … Continue reading

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Power, othering, and slurs in the clinic: undermining the capacity for care
Alison Reiheld

Over at the Feminist Midwife, we find a valuable post on WHY something that may seem prima facie wrong is, in fact, wrong.  In an entry called “Patients Are Not Bitches, and Thoughts Medical Othering,” Feminist Midwife considers a case … Continue reading

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‘Mom, I want to die, you can go in the Canada. I want to die in the snow, you can go, mom, in the Canada.’
Editor

Recent developments in American politics continue to exacerbate the migration on foot of refugees from the US to Canada. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has been covering this trend, and we at IJFAB Blog have also been watching. In a new … Continue reading

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“You suffer. That is enough for me.”
Editor

Thanks to Gretchen Case for this image of the Pasteur Memorial at Cook County Hospital in Chicago.  It is a timely reminder as the context for global public health shifts, and many powerful nations (US, UK, France, and other European … Continue reading

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It’s Only Words: On Refugees and Liminality
Anna Gotlib

I sit in front of my computer in New York, contemplating how I am going to speak to groups of people about refugees, narratives, and moral luck in two days’ time.  It is not that I am overly worried about … Continue reading

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A Door Slams in the Night
Kathryn MacKay

Give me your tired, your poor Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me: I lift my lamp beside the golden door. – Emma Lazarus I’m writing … Continue reading

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Bioethics Meets Families in The Netherlands this Summer
Jamie Nelson

EDITOR’S NOTE: IJFAB Blog is pleased to have Jamie L. Nelson, of IJFAB’s editorial team and Michigan State University, join us as a regular contributor. Her work has been linked from the blog previously in this entry on Bathrooms, Binaries, … Continue reading

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A Shift in the Anti-Abortion Movement: Are feminist woman-centered values gaining ground?
Editor

In April, the IJFAB Blog editor provided some information on pro-life feminism in an entry called “Pro-Life Feminism: A Catholic feminist philosopher considers the consequences of punishing women for seeking abortions” mentioning both Sidney Callahan’s famous essay on the subject and … Continue reading

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Just Caring for Caregivers in the U.S. Workplace… For Some Workers
Alison Reiheld

On September 8, 2016, Deloitte LLP announced it would grant 16 weeks of paid leave to employees who provide family caregiving not only to new children, but to older children, parents, and spouses.  This is an enormous improvement in the U.S. … Continue reading

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The poetry of hands-on healing, and the failure to do so
Alison Reiheld

In 2013, Rafael Campo–then associate professor of medicine at Harvard–won the Hippocrates Open International Prize for Poetry and Medicine.  First, let us be grateful that there is such a thing, a thing to draw beauty out of what isn’t always. … Continue reading

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Dwarfism, Chemical Limb Lengthening, and Informed Consent
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According to a recent article in the popular press, a California based biotech firm, BioMarin Pharmaceuticals, has completed Phase 2 of a clinical trial for a drug that would partially suppress the expression of the Achondroplasia gene in a child’s … Continue reading

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Disability, the UK General Election, and what it means for bioethics

It may not have escaped your notice that Britain has just had a general election. The result decides the flavour of the government, probably for the next 5 years. The outcome on 8 May was widely unpredicted: the polls had … Continue reading

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