Alison Reiheld

About Alison Reiheld

Alison Reiheld has a background in biology, through which she came to bioethics. She received her Ph.D. in philosophy at Michigan State University where she taught for many years at the Lyman Briggs College of Science. Dr. Reiheld is currently the Director of Women’s Studies and an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville.

Who Should Be Responsible for Environment, Health, and Politics: Detroit and 1,300 other “hotspots” have higher lead poisoning rates than Flint and someone needs to do something
Alison Reiheld

The long-time reader of IJFAB Blog, and alert bioethicist who follows the news, will remember the Flint water crisis.  As numerous investigative news articles–and even at least one news comedy show–have pointed out, Flint is by no means alone in the … Continue reading

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What you don’t know CAN hurt you: Epistemic Injustice and Conceptually Impoverished Health Promotion
Alison Reiheld

I want to consider a particular kind of wrong within medicine and health promotion: epistemic injustice and its harms. My case study is obesity conceived of as a public health concern. However, the analytic framework I deploy may prove useful … Continue reading

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Police, providers, and patients: between a rock and a hard place? Not really
Alison Reiheld

The Salt Lake Tribune (from the US State of Utah) posted an article yesterday about a nurse who refused to let a police officer trained in phlebotomy take a blood sample from an unconscious patient. The nurse was arrested and … Continue reading

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IJFAB discounted subscription rates

Hi, folks. I just got this in my e-mail and thought I’d share it more widely in case anyone is interested in the IJFAB subscription discount that University of Toronto Press is offering this summer. The full advert includes pictures … Continue reading

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ACA repeal-and-replace, at least in any of its current forms, will devastate rural Americans
Alison Reiheld

Since 2010, I have incorporated Remote Area Medical (RAM) into my medical ethics teaching. RAM is an organization that relies on corporate donations, individual charitable donations, and time-and-skill donations by health care providers to provide healthcare boot camps for 2-3 days … Continue reading

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To reproduce or not to reproduce, and if so how much, that is the question
Alison Reiheld

Over at Foreign Policy recently, philosophers Travis Rieder and Rebecca Kukla engaged in a thoughtful, pleasant, and yet provocative dialogue about reproductive considerations in light of climate change (Rieder, Colin Hickey, and Jake Earl recently published an article about the … Continue reading

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The Revenge Effects of Electronic Medical Records
Alison Reiheld

In 1996, historian of science Edward Tenner published his influential book Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences. It is an extended consideration of how technology comes to demand much of us even as it frees us from … Continue reading

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Not a desire which anyone may gratify: what impact might artificial wombs have on abortion?
Alison Reiheld

Amidst the flurry of news in the last week over artificial wombs–a primitive artificial placental sack, or “biobag”, sustained sheep fetuses for four weeks–most of the coverage focused on the value in caring for premature infants. I was reminded of Judith … Continue reading

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Like and unlike: Late abortion in the case of wanted pregnancies, and miscarriage
Alison Reiheld

A recent article by Natalia Megas in The Guardian profiles three women who chose late abortions and who had very much wanted to be pregnant.  It is a moving exploration of the seriousness of abortion as a moral issue, and an important set … Continue reading

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Power, othering, and slurs in the clinic: undermining the capacity for care
Alison Reiheld

Over at the Feminist Midwife, we find a valuable post on WHY something that may seem prima facie wrong is, in fact, wrong.  In an entry called “Patients Are Not Bitches, and Thoughts Medical Othering,” Feminist Midwife considers a case … Continue reading

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What does a Trump Presidency mean for the Affordable Care Act and American patients’ access to care?
Alison Reiheld

Since Trump’s electoral college victory became apparent early Wednesday morning and especially since Secretary Clinton’s concession speech, many bioethicists–and many more American residents–have been wondering what a Trump Presidency means for the Affordable Care Act, AKA “Obamacare.” While the ACA … Continue reading

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Just Caring for Caregivers in the U.S. Workplace… For Some Workers
Alison Reiheld

On September 8, 2016, Deloitte LLP announced it would grant 16 weeks of paid leave to employees who provide family caregiving not only to new children, but to older children, parents, and spouses.  This is an enormous improvement in the U.S. … Continue reading

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