Alison Reiheld

About Alison Reiheld

Alison Reiheld has a background in biology, through which she came to bioethics. She received her Ph.D. in philosophy at Michigan State University where she taught for many years at the Lyman Briggs College of Science. Dr. Reiheld is currently the Director of Women's Studies and an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville.

Power, othering, and slurs in the clinic: undermining the capacity for care
Alison Reiheld

Over at the Feminist Midwife, we find a valuable post on WHY something that may seem prima facie wrong is, in fact, wrong.  In an entry called “Patients Are Not Bitches, and Thoughts Medical Othering,” Feminist Midwife considers a case … Continue reading

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What does a Trump Presidency mean for the Affordable Care Act and American patients’ access to care?
Alison Reiheld

Since Trump’s electoral college victory became apparent early Wednesday morning and especially since Secretary Clinton’s concession speech, many bioethicists–and many more American residents–have been wondering what a Trump Presidency means for the Affordable Care Act, AKA “Obamacare.” While the ACA … Continue reading

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Just Caring for Caregivers in the U.S. Workplace… For Some Workers
Alison Reiheld

On September 8, 2016, Deloitte LLP announced it would grant 16 weeks of paid leave to employees who provide family caregiving not only to new children, but to older children, parents, and spouses.  This is an enormous improvement in the U.S. … Continue reading

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Telling Tales: Narratives About Black Men and Obesity

EDITOR’S NOTE: This entry was originally published on IJFAB Blog December 19 of 2014.  In the early hours of July 5, 2016, Alton Sterling of Baton Rouge, LA was shot dead by police. He was a father, selling CDs outside … Continue reading

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Not the parity we want: Disordered eating and normative appetites in North American men and women
Alison Reiheld

Editor’s Note: This blog entry is based on a paper presented by Prof. Reiheld at FAB Congress 2016 in Edinburgh. Philosopher Sandra Bartky persuasively argued for a Foucauldian framework conceptualizing femininity as a disciplinary regime that creates docile bodies through … Continue reading

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Tweeting a FAB Congress 2016 narrative

The most excellent Kelly Danielle, who has recently become involved with FAB and was at FAB Congress in Edinburgh, volunteered to “storify” FAB 2016 tweets. As you may know, twitter presents the most recent tweet first. This can make it … Continue reading

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FAB Congress in full swing!

FAB Congress kicked off this morning with an excellent talk by Prof. Kate Hunt at University of Glasgow in Scotland. Hunt is the Associate Director at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit. Hunt’s paper described gender differences in … Continue reading

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The poetry of hands-on healing, and the failure to do so
Alison Reiheld

In 2013, Rafael Campo–then associate professor of medicine at Harvard–won the Hippocrates Open International Prize for Poetry and Medicine.  First, let us be grateful that there is such a thing, a thing to draw beauty out of what isn’t always. … Continue reading

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Bathrooms, Binaries, and Bioethics: Jamie Nelson takes on the American debate over gender and bathroom access
Alison Reiheld

With a blogpost over at Michigan State’s Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, feminist bioethicist Jamie Lindemann Nelson has dipped her toes into the acid bath that is the American debate over gender and bathroom access.  Nelson has … Continue reading

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On The Costs of Simplistic Thinking: Reproductive Health Clinics Aren’t Just For Abortions
Alison Reiheld

The purpose of this post is not to argue against anti-abortion protesters. It is to narrowly and briefly explore what the harms done by principled, committed anti-abortion protesters when they assume that Reproductive Health Clinics, and procedures they perform, are … Continue reading

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Gendered Medicalization of Sexual Desire?
A Medical Sociologist Reflects on How “Women’s Viagra” Isn’t Like Viagra at All

The medical humanities have long drawn attention to the way that social power structures and value judgments affect diagnoses and the very disease categories on which those diagnoses are based. Peter Conrad famously discussed medicalization—the process by which a human … Continue reading

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When Does a Plea Become Pathology?
Alison Reiheld

NOTE: this author uses captions to describe the content of images so that visually impaired persons can have some access to the content of images through their audio readers. Readers with typical visual acuity may find some of the content … Continue reading

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