HRO reviews new book by former IJFAB editor Mary Rawlinson on sexual difference
Editor

As you may know, bioethicist Mary Rawlinson saw the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics through much of its first decade as Editor. Over at Hypatia Reviews Online, Jordan Liz has a review of Rawlinson’s new book. Liz notes that Rawlinson … Continue reading

Share Button

Online Symposium on Melinda Hall’s book on disability and biopolitics
Editor

The blog Discrimination and Disadvantage is in the midst of an on-line symposium on Melinda Hall’s new book The Bioethics of Enhancement: Transhumanism, Disability, and Biopolitics. Commentaries by Shelley Tremain as well as Jane Dryden and Ladelle McWhorter are already up, with one more … Continue reading

Share Button

The Revenge Effects of Electronic Medical Records
Alison Reiheld

In 1996, historian of science Edward Tenner published his influential book Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences. It is an extended consideration of how technology comes to demand much of us even as it frees us from … Continue reading

Share Button

Body Ecology and Commodification in The Handmaid’s Tale
Rebecca Bratten Weiss

Editor’s Note: This is one of several blog entries on Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale. For the first in the series, go here. The Handmaid’s Tale was one of many texts which, when I finally read it, turned out to be very different … Continue reading

Share Button

Not a desire which anyone may gratify: what impact might artificial wombs have on abortion?
Alison Reiheld

Amidst the flurry of news in the last week over artificial wombs–a primitive artificial placental sack, or “biobag”, sustained sheep fetuses for four weeks–most of the coverage focused on the value in caring for premature infants. I was reminded of Judith … Continue reading

Share Button

End-of-life care, and counseling, varies with disease type
Editor

US News and World Report recently published an article summarizing the results of a study of Veterans Affairs hospitals. The study found that patients with cancer or dementia received better end-of-life counseling, more palliative care, and better end-of-life planning on the … Continue reading

Share Button

Women: Not Faring So Well on Wikipedia

From The New Yorker, “A Feminist Edit-a-Thon Seeks to Reshape Wikipedia“: In spite of the site’s ostensibly egalitarian, accessible format, more than ninety per cent of its editors are male, according to a study conducted in 2011 by the Wikimedia Foundation. … Continue reading

Share Button

“Gene Editing: A Chance to Think About Diversity”

Jackie Leach Scully (Newcastle) on the need for a broader bioethical discussion about the possibilities and dangers of gene editing: Gene editing clearly holds the potential to improve human lives in practical ways. It also offers something more abstract but, to … Continue reading

Share Button

Bioethics in Catastrophe?

Guest post by Melinda Hall (Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Stetson University) In “Human Engineering and Climate Change,” bioethicists S. Matthew Liao, Anders Sandberg, and Rebecca Roache argue that anthropogenic climate change is one of the biggest problems humans face as we move … Continue reading

Share Button

“First Gene Therapy Drug Sets Million-Euro Price Record”

This news item underlines one of the most urgent issues raised by commodified drug development and marketing, and it deserves far more attention and analysis than I am able to provide here. It has been known for sometime that drug prices … Continue reading

Share Button

“Rape Is Not a Data Problem: The tech sector has tackled sexual violence like it tackles laundry delivery, and entirely missed the point”

Undercover Colors and Good2Go are technological tattletales. Both are designed to tell the truth about an encounter, with the objectivity and dispassion of a database or a chemical reaction. Tattletale solutions make sense only if we see rape, fundamentally, as … Continue reading

Share Button

“Rape Is Not a Data Problem: The tech sector has tackled sexual violence like it tackles laundry delivery, and entirely missed the point”

Undercover Colors and Good2Go are technological tattletales. Both are designed to tell the truth about an encounter, with the objectivity and dispassion of a database or a chemical reaction. Tattletale solutions make sense only if we see rape, fundamentally, as … Continue reading

Share Button